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How to make a difference in politics: A practical ...

A democratic Republic such as ours is a large and complex system. So the very first thing you should give up is the idea that you will quickly and easily make a huge impact. I know it is disappointing, but the system isn’t quickly or easily changed, and that is ultimately good thing. That said, there are three paths along which you can, over time, make a difference: activism, operative, and elected office. Let’s take these...

So you want to replace your Congressman (yourself)

Advice for those considering running for Congress. To get elected you have to run a campaign. Running a campaign is like starting a small business, one that is funded entirely by donations. You have to hire a team, fundraise, give them direction, fundraise, open offices, fundraise, figure out marketing, fundraise, create posters and flyers, fundraise, make ads, fundraise, run ads, fundraise… Oh, and there is a lot of...

Why congressional Republicans are hesitant to take...

There are four main reasons why congressional Republicans are hesitant to take on Trump. The first is simple tribal loyalty. He identifies as a Republican, he ran as a Republican, and he was elected as a Republican. And—the Tea Party excepted—the Republican Party of the last several decades has been very hesitant to move against other Republicans. You can argue that a similar dynamic exists among Democrats, and you would be...

Don’t Expect Political Compromise Any Time S...

As long as districts remain gerrymandered, the best bet for any House Democrat currently in office is to follow the GOP roadmap (obstruction). After all, they will face increasing pressure from the left. For statewide races (Senate) red states will remain red, blue states will remain blue. Only a handful will be up for grabs, so only those handful of politicians in those purple states face any real pressure to look like they...

Why I don’t trust our society to run nuclear...

The social problem with nuclear power is this. If some fool blows up the economy (or if a perverse structure of incentives drive a whole herd of bankers to blow up the economy) we all suffer for a few years, or even decades. But our grandchildren will be ok. If the same dynamic leads to a full reactor meltdown somewhere, then you could have 1% of the US uninhabitable for the next ten millennium (to say nothing of premature...