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Interspecies coevolution of languages on the North...

It turns out that the NY Times’ article “What scientists believe but they can’t prove” is an extract of a far larger essay collection at an online magazine called The Edge. There are further articles there, and a surprising number on the nature of consciousness and the relation of language to consciousness. Another one I found fascinating was: Interspecies coevolution of languages on the Northwest...

Children are more conscious than adults

Another quote from the NY Times’ article on what scientists believe but they can’t prove. Alison Gopnik Psychologist, University of California, Berkeley; co-author, “The Scientist in the Crib” I believe, but cannot prove, that babies and young children are actually more conscious, more vividly aware of their external world and internal life, than adults are. I believe this because there is strong...

View from the other side

The very next opinion in the NY Times’ article on what scientists believe but they can’t prove is a striking contrast. Nicholas Humphrey Psychologist, London School of Economics; author, “The Mind Made Flesh” I believe that human consciousness is a conjuring trick, designed to fool us into thinking we are in the presence of an inexplicable mystery. Who is the conjuror and why is s/he doing it? The...

What do you believe that you can’t prove?

The NY Times ran a great article about what scientists believe but they can’t prove. It yielded some great things from an Anthroposophical perspective, such as: Donald Hoffman Cognitive scientist, University of California, Irvine; author, “Visual Intelligence” I believe that consciousness and its contents are all that exists. Space-time, matter and fields never were the fundamental denizens of the universe...

Terms and their meanings

My previous posting brings up the interesting question of whether, when two people use the same terminology, they necessarily mean the same thing. Especially in the area of spiritual beliefs, and involving authors whose work is prolific, it may actually be that they refer to different concepts under the same name. That this is in principle possible is evident in the fact that numerous and very different conceptions exist...

Materialism and Science

Materialism supposes that all things and all actions in the physical world are effects of causes  that themselves lie in the physical world. The spiritual does not exist, and even if it did, it would  have no relationship to the physical world. Consciousness and all thoughts are effects of molecules in the brains of  evolved mammals. This is the essence of pure philosophical materialism. In common usage the word is a...